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The Pro Style Workout-Defense Portion

After you run the 60, typically there will be a defensive workout.  Most events will limit how many positions you can work out at.  If you legitimately play more than 1 position, then showcasing at those can be a good thing.   If you are an OF that hasn't played SS since little league, maybe just stick with the OF.  In general only showcase your strongest positions.  Remember you want to showcase your strengths, not your weaknesses.   A lot of events will have a radar gun getting readings at all positions.  Certainly high #'s on the radar gun can raise an eyebrow.  Keep in mind that if college coaches are watching the workout, they are not just evaluating your arm strength.  They are looking at how well you can play the position.  So ignoring fielding mechanics, taking too many steps to get rid of it, using a long arm action, and/or cheating the distance can hurt you more than it helps you in the notes a college coach is taking on you.  Here are some thoughts for each position.

OUTFIELD - You will most likely be lined up behind some cones in RF at a normal OF depth.  There might be a Coach using a fungo, pitching machine or even throwing balls to you.  These might be on the ground and/or in the air.  For this I recommend taking your time to an extent.  You can use the mindset of Fast-Slow-Fast.  Go quick to the ball, slow down to ensure fielding it cleanly and getting a good grip, then quick with your arm.  A lot of balls arrive on the ground in the OF so showing you can field a ball hit on the ground is important.  If you are out of control and you end up misplaying balls as a result it will hurt you.  For balls in the air make sure you get behind the ball so you can generate momentum going into the catch.  Once you have a handle on the ball and are executing your throwing motion, use the maximum effort you can control.  Keeping the ball on a line will help college coaches see your arm strength.  If you throw a moon ball to try to get it there in the air it is difficult to evaluate.  Keep it on a line, can be slightly above the cut off to allow for a LITTLE more carry.  In general think laser not rainbow.   If this is a large event and there are 10 or more players going ahead of you, it is important to stay warm.  When there are about 2 or 3 players ahead of you do some jumping jacks, arm circles and dry throwing motions to get ready.  This will help your performance and reduce chance of injury.

INFIELD - Typically all 3b,SS and 2b positions will showcase at SS.  This will either be off a fungo or a machine.  Typically you will get 4 ground balls.  1 at you, 1 fore hand, 1 back hand and a slow roller to finish.  I recommend the same concept as before.  Fast-Slow-Fast.  College coaches will be evaluating your footwork, hands, exchange, arm strength and accuracy.  In general they will be asking themselves, does this player look like they will make the routine play consistently.  So fast to the ball, don't sit back and let the ball play you.  Choose the the top of the big hop if you can or play through the short hop.  Slow during the fielding act-Get your feet under you while getting a good grip.  Fast on the throwing action.  Make sure your arm action is short-not long.  Put as much effort on it as you can command.  You want to show a quick exchange, short arm action and a firm accurate throw.  This applies to the first 2 ground balls.  For the back hand this is the best time to show your arm strength.  So fast to the ball, slow to make sure you field it cleanly.  Once fielding it I recommend taking 1 shuffle step to get your feet under you and some momentum towards first base.  Yes you might not have time in a game for that, but for the workout I recommend it.  I would let it air out on this throw without air mailing it at least.  For the slow roller this probably should be fast-fast-fast.  Quick to the ball, maybe slow a tick as you get close in order to get the top of a big hop, but then quick through the catch-exchange and throw.  Make sure to aim it to the left of the first baseman as it will most likely tail back.  If this is a large event and there are 10 or more players going ahead of you, it is important to stay warm.  When there are about 2 or 3 players ahead of you do some jumping jacks, arm circles and dry throwing motions to get ready.  This will help your performance and reduce chance of injury.

FIRST BASE - Your hitting might be the reason you get recruited, but in order to play 1b in college you need to be able to play the position.  So showcasing this is important.  Otherwise getting recruited as a DH is tougher.  1b is involved in a lot of plays during the course of s game.  Workouts vary in the throws to 2b and 3b.  You may take some ground balls playing off the bag and others holding an imaginary runner.  I still recommend Fast-Slow-Fast for the ground balls.  Give yourself time to choose the top of the big hop or play through the short hop.  For throws to 2b, use short arm action and get rid of it.  If they have you throw to 3b, get your feet under you and use 1 shuffle to get momentum.  Use the maximum effort you can control.  Although arm strength is rarely used at 1b, if you have it you want to show it here.  The slow roller to 3b perhaps could happen in some bunt coverages, but you rarely see it.  I would say fast-slow-fast still.  You don't have to show a lightning quick exchange as a 1b, but show that you can field a slow roller cleanly and make an accurate throw to 3b.  If this is a large event and there are 10 or more players going ahead of you, it is important to stay warm.  When there are about 2 or 3 players ahead of you do some jumping jacks, arm circles and dry throwing motions to get ready.  This will help your performance and reduce chance of injury.

CATCHERS - Typically you will have a couple throws to 2b and a couple to 3b.  A coach will typically throw to you from BP distance slightly off to the side.  You will probably be in full gear.  Yes, every coach will have their watches out most likely, but showcasing here is more than just a good pop time.  Arm strength and accuracy are important.  Everyone can see where home plate is so don't cheat.  Let the ball come to you and stay down until the ball gets close.  Be as quick as you can execute.  You will need to have a good grip to get a good throw off.  Use the maximum effort level you can command.  Ideally give the MIF a knee high throw to the runners side of the bag.  Same concept for throws to 3b.  Some workouts will have you block, scramble and make a throw.  Make sure to execute a good block first.  This will give you the best chance at placing the ball closer to you.  Fast-slow-fast.  Quick to the ball, slow getting your chest over top of it pressing  straight down onto the ball to get a grip, then fast short arm action for a firm accurate throw.  If this is a large event and there are 10 or more players going ahead of you, it is important to stay warm.  When there are about 2 or 3 players ahead of you do some jumping jacks, arm circles and dry throwing motions to get ready.  This will help your performance and reduce chance of injury.

The pro style defensive workout can get you circled, but won't get you where you want to go.  Ultimately all evaluaters will want to see you do it in a game.  It is important to give it your best effort, but do not let the workout results consume your focus.  



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